Archive for April, 2012

Watch the incredible video of legendary rapper Tupac perform with Snoop Dogg more than 15 years after his death.

 
Return: Fans of the rapper were overwhelmed by the hologram
                                                     Return: Fans of the rapper were overwhelmed by the hologram
                                                   

Legendary rapper Tupac Shakur was brought back to life with a giant hologram at Coachella.

The deceased hip-hop star performed a song by himself before collaborating with Snoop Dogg, who was headlining the massive California festival.

Together they sang Come With Me, Gangsta Party and Hail Mary – a song that Tupac has never performed live and was released after his death more than 15 years ago.

Tupac, who was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996, looked remarkably lifelike.

A hologram of deceased rapper Tupac Shakur at Coachella
                                                    Conspiracy: Some people believe that Tupac is still alive
                      

Bare-chested and wearing a pair of jeans that looked circa 1995, the famous ‘Thug Life’ tattoo was seen clearly across his front.

The high-tech 3D image of the late star, which cost a reported $10 million, was used by Mariah Carey to perform five simultaneous concerts across Europe last year.

A hologram of deceased rapper Tupac Shakur at Coachella

Unveiled: Tupac performs Hail Mary for the first time

The hologram left everyone in disbelief with Katy Perry, who is at the festival, posting on Twitter: “I think I might have cried when I saw Tupac.”

And the late rapper was one of many special guests who joined Snoop on stage.

Dr Dre and Eminem turned up to perform Forgot About Dre, I Need a Doctor and Till I Collapse.

A hologram of deceased rapper Tupac Shakur at Coachella

Final goodbye? This could be the last time we see Tupac perform

Warning: Bad language in video below:

Article Source Link: http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/going-out/music/tupac-returns-at-coachella-with-snoop-dogg-796455

JP

“Keep your nose to the ground and your eyes to the sky.”

This week the U.S. military took one step toward making the freakish humanoid robots of Arnold Schwarzenneger’s Terminator films a reality. For real. Thank heavens there’s friendlier (and tastier!) bot news, too.
 

petman

Bot Vid: DARPA’s New Pet Is Petman

DARPA just announced its most recent Robotics Challenge, a “game” that solicits innovative solutions to hypothetical future war problems. Mere moments later … it announced a winner! What gives? Well, since the new Challenge was for humanoid robots, and DARPA is funding a hugely advanced Terminator-like machine from Boston Dynamics called PETMAN….it’ll be of no surprise to learn PETMAN is the winner. To celebrate, there’s a new PETMAN video to send Arnie-like chills right up your spine.

Bot Vid: Sushi Bot

Sushi is an art–just check out the astonishingly charming film Jiro Dreams of Sushi for proof–but it’s also a delicious kind of food with global popularity, prompting mechanization of the delicate production process to suit the mass market. Cue Suzumo company’s new SushiBots, which can kick out up to 3,600 maki rolls an hour, all with the reported subtle touches that a human would apply, without cutting so much as a grain of rice.

Bot Vid: Shapely Balls

Once considered by the world’s thinkers to be the “perfect” shape, a sphere is evidently a pretty ideal form for many obejcts to take, because it can roll and smoothly be transported through chutes and pipes as well as being structurally strong. Now there’s a bot that borrows the sphere aesthetic and marries it to a standard hexapod walking system to make a compound machine that can maneuver using three different modes dependent on terrain and user requirements. It’s called MorpHex.

Bot News

Robots to protect the Titanic. Concerned that the effects of nearby shipping and tourist deep-dive vessels visiting the site are causing the wreck to rapidly degrade, the original discoverer of the Titanic’s broken body on the floor of the Atlantic ocean, Robert Ballard, is now proposing that a fleet of deep-sea robots permanently “man” the location. They would paint the vessel with anti-fouling paint so that bacteria wouldn’t eat any more of its iron skin and also monitor human visitor missions to make sure they don’t touch the wreck or damage it in any way. As of now, the 100 year-old shipwreck is a UNESCO-protected heritage site.

Did NASA’s robot find life on Mars in 1976? The robot Viking missions were a striking and powerful symbol of our early successes in space exploration, landing on the distant surface of Mars in the mid-’70s and returning photographs and science data from Mars that were the most revelatory ever about its makeup and life-bearing potential. At the time scientists concluded its experiments designed to search for the evidence of life drew a blank. But now new analysis of the data (which survives as printouts) has suggested that there really was evidence of complex behavior indicative of life in the soil samples the doughty little robot investigated. And if we want proof, the University of Southern California team suggests, all we need to do is fly a sufficiently powerful microscope to Mars…and we’d see microbes.

UAVs get a new launch trick. Utah Water Research scientists have looked at the rather tricky question of how best to launch surveillance drones into the air, and have come up with a fabulously biblical solution: A slingshot launch system. Their bungee-slingshot UAVs are being used to map the environment. 

Bot Futures: Robot production line workers

The ongoing, sticky mess involving worker conditions in Foxconn’s plants in China has this week resulted in almost unprecedented access for a journalist to the iPad production line. What we see is a highly human-centered process, but with countless pieces of machinery assisting almost every step of the assembly:

We know that Western public condemnation of worker conditions has pushed Apple to make unmatched efforts to improve the situation (even though much of the “condemnation” may be a little misplaced, particularly when it comes to worker salaries of “$14 a day,” due to misunderstanding global currency economics), but it’s definitely evident that the production line jobs are tedious and repetitive to the nth degree. That’s something Foxconn’s CEO has pledged to change, by augmenting his factories with still more robotic assistance.

But the rise of China as a manufacturing force for all sorts of goods, not just electronics, may actually change the local and global stage of robotic workers. That’s partly because of rising wages, which make 24-hour-reliable robots more efficient employees, partly due to the improved perfection a robot can achieve, and partly due to international criticisms of Chinese working conditions. Kuka robots, Europe’s most successful maker of industrial bots, is now reported to be building a Chinese hub…making 5,000 robots a year in the nation instead of the 1,000 or so it was making just two years ago. Other robot firms across the EU, in Japan, and the U.S. are also predicting rapid growth in China’s demand for robot production line units, and this rush is pushing the global market value of industrial robots skyrocketing to about $41 billion by 2020. China may swifty outpace Japan and South Korea as the most robotized nation.

Which is both good news and bad news for Chinese workers. What if the robots don’t just displace workers from tedious or dangerous roles into ones where humans excell and robots’ can’t match just yet (such as quality assurance) but displace them out of work? And then there’s a bigger question of the rise of robotic workers across the world. Some vocal Apple critics demaned that it reposition its manufacturing facilities in the U.S.–but can you picture a future where Apple did this, but peopled its floors with thousands upon thousands of robot workers, rather than fleshy ones? This could get complicated for the Teamsters.

Article Source Link: http://www.fastcompany.com/1830837/this-week-in-bots?partner=gnews

JP

The chance of modern day Robocops being called in to help with American crimes is seeming more likely, with US police forces being told they can request battlefield robots produced by the Defence Logistics Agency (DLA) over the last decade.

Defence Agency delegates told a conference in Washington last week that any police or homeland security department with a counter-terrorism or anti-drug mission may be eligible to get its very own robot.

Dan Arnold, a regional manager of the agency’s Disposition Office, says that ‘hundreds’ of war-hardened robots will be donated to police departments.

The likeliest robotic police recruits are ground robots, used for tactical surveillance or for explosives-handling.

The robots most likely to be used are those such as the Throwbot, a small robot which can be thrown by troops around corners to expand their fields of vision.

Robots such as the PackBot and Talon machines, which have become central to bomb disposal in Afghanistan and other war zones, may also come into use by security departments.

 
Miami-Dade police are already piloting a spy robot for the skies, developed by the Pentagon

Miami-Dade police are already piloting a spy robot for the skies, developed by the Pentagon

The Defence Logistics Agency says it is not sure yet which robots it will be donating to which forces, because it will depend, in part, on a surplus of particular robots in military depots.

‘At this time, DLA Disposition Services does not know which robots in particular will be deemed excess as that decision is being made by the Army,’ said Lieutenant colonel Melinda Morgan, a Defence Department spokeswoman.

‘The item manager for these robots, located at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, will determine which models can be declared excess based on operational requirements and sufficient numbers of newer models presently in stock,’ she says.

Octavia is a firefighting robot which has recently been revealed by the US Navy

Octavia is a firefighting robot which has recently been revealed by the US Navy

Miami-Dade police already fly a 14-pound (6.3 kg) spy robot developed for the Pentagon.

The pilotless aircraft is small enough to fit in a backpack and can be launched at a moment’s notice, making it a key tool in tight situations.

Developed by aircraft manufacturers Honeywell, the drone is a solution to deal with siege incidents when hostage-takers barricade themselves in a building.

The U.S. Navy’s Naval Research Laboratory has recently been testing Octavia, a fire fighting robot designed to work alongside a human team.

The Navy says the robot is built for ‘shoulder-to-shoulder’ damage control, but still needs ‘some fine tuning’.

Robots that ‘bleed’ like Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Terminator have come one step closer to reality.

Scientists have created a plastic ‘skin’ that oozes red blood when cut.

It can also ‘heal’ itself, building tiny molecular bridges inside in response to damage.

The red ‘blood’ might sound like a pointless Halloween novelty – but the idea is that the ‘skin’ can warn engineers that a structure such as an aicraft wing has been damaged.

The material could provide self-healing surfaces for a multitude of products ranging from mobile phones and laptops to cars, say researchers.

When cut, the plastic turns from clear to red along the line of the damage, mimicking what happens to skin.

It reacts to ordinary light, or changes in temperature or acidity, by mending broken molecular ‘bridges’ to heal itself.

U.S. scientists told how they created the material at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting in San Diego, California.

Lead researcher Professor Marek Urban, from the University of Southern Mississippi, said: ‘Mother Nature has endowed all kinds of biological systems with the ability to repair themselves.

‘Some we can see, like the skin healing and new bark forming in cuts on a tree trunk. Some are invisible, but help keep us alive and healthy, like the self-repair system that DNA uses to fix genetic damage to genes.

‘Our new plastic tries to mimic nature, issuing a red signal when damaged and then renewing itself when exposed to visible light, temperature or pH changes.’

The material could flag up damage to critical aircraft structures, said Prof Urban. A decision could then be taken whether to replace the component or ‘heal’ it with a burst of intense light.

Scratches on vehicle fenders could be repaired the same way.
Prof Urban’s team is now working on incorporating the technology into plastics that can withstand high temperatures.

 
 
JP

Most people think of a cashless society as something that is way off in the distant future.  Unfortunately, that is simply not the case.  The truth is that a cashless society is much closer than most people would ever dare to imagine.  To a large degree, the transition to a cashless society is being done voluntarily.  Today, only 7 percent of all transactions in the United States are done with cash, and most of those transactions involve very small amounts of money.  Just think about it for a moment.  Where do you still use cash these days?  If you buy a burger or if you purchase something at a flea market you will still use cash, but for any mid-size or large transaction the vast majority of people out there will use another form of payment.  Our financial system is dramatically changing, and cash is rapidly becoming a thing of the past.  We live in a digital world, and national governments and big banks are both encouraging the move away from paper currency and coins.  But what would a cashless society mean for our future?  Are there any dangers to such a system?

Those are very important questions, but most of the time both sides of the issue are not presented in a balanced way in the mainstream media.  Instead, most mainstream news articles tend to trash cash and talk about how wonderful digital currency is.

For example, a recent CBS News article declared that soon we may not need “that raggedy dollar bill” any longer and that the “greenback may soon be a goner”….

It’s what the wallet was invented for, to carry cash. After all, there was a time when we needed cash everywhere we went, from filling stations to pay phones. Even the tooth fairy dealt only in cash.

But money isn’t just physical anymore. It’s not only the pennies in your piggy bank, or that raggedy dollar bill.

Money is also digital – it’s zeros and ones stored in a computer, prompting some economists to predict the old-fashioned greenback may soon be a goner.

“There will be a time – I don’t know when, I can’t give you a date – when physical money is just going to cease to exist,” said economist Robert Reich.

So will we see a completely cashless society in the near future?

Of course not.  It would be wildly unpopular for the governments of the world to force such a system upon us all at once.

Instead, the big banks and the governments of the industrialized world are doing all they can to get us to voluntarily transition to such a system.  Once 98 or 99 percent of all transactions do not involve cash, eliminating the remaining 1 or 2 percent will only seem natural.

The big banks want a cashless society because it is much more profitable for them.

The big banks earn billions of dollars in fees from debit cards and they make absolutely enormous profits from credit cards.

But when people use cash the big banks do not earn anything.

So obviously the big banks and the big credit card companies are big cheerleaders for a cashless society.

Most governments around the world are eager to transition to a cashless society as well for the following reasons….

-Cash is expensive to print, inspect, move, store and guard.

-Counterfeiting is always going to be a problem as long as paper currency exists.

-Cash if favored by criminals because it does not leave a paper trail.  Eliminating cash would make it much more difficult for drug dealers, prostitutes and other criminals to do business.

-Most of all, a cashless society would give governments more control.  Governments would be able to track virtually all transactions and would also be able to monitor tax compliance much more closely.

When you understand the factors listed above, it becomes easier to understand why the use of cash is increasingly becoming demonized.  Governments around the world are increasingly viewing the use of cash in a negative light.  In fact, according to the U.S. government paying with cash in some circumstances is now considered to be “suspicious activity” that needs to be reported to the authorities.

This disdain of cash has also grown very strong in the financial community.  The following is from a recent Slate article….

David Birch, a director at Consult Hyperion, a firm specializing in electronic payments, says a shift to digital currency would cut out these hidden costs. In Birch’s ideal world, paying with cash would be viewed like drunk driving—something we do with decreasing frequency as more and more people understand the negative social consequences. “We’re trying to use industrial age money to support commerce in a post-industrial age. It just doesn’t work,” he says. “Sooner or later, the tectonic plates shift and then, very quickly, you’ll find yourself in this new environment where if you ask somebody to pay you in cash, you’ll just assume that they’re a prostitute or a Somali pirate.”

Do you see what is happening?

Simply using cash is enough to get you branded as a potential criminal these days.

Many people are going to be scared away from using cash simply because of the stigma that is becoming attached to it.

This is a trend that is not just happening in the United States.  In fact, many other countries are further down the road toward a cashless society than we are.

Up in Canada, they are looking for ways to even eliminate coins so that people can use alternate forms of payment for all of their transactions….

The Royal Canadian Mint is also looking to the future with the MintChip, a new product that could become a digital replacement for coins.

In Sweden, only about 3 percent of all transactions still involve cash.  The following comes from a recent Washington Post article….

In most Swedish cities, public buses don’t accept cash; tickets are prepaid or purchased with a cell phone text message. A small but growing number of businesses only take cards, and some bank offices — which make money on electronic transactions — have stopped handling cash altogether.

“There are towns where it isn’t at all possible anymore to enter a bank and use cash,” complains Curt Persson, chairman of Sweden’s National Pensioners’ Organization.

In Italy, all very large cash transactions have been banned.  Previously, the limit for using cash in a transaction had been reduced to the equivalent of just a few thousand dollars.  But back in December, Prime Minister Mario Monti proposed a new limit of approximately $1,300 for cash transactions.

And that is how many governments will transition to a cashless society.  They will set a ceiling and then they will keep lowering it and lowering it.

But is a cashless society really secure?

Of course not.

Bank accounts can be hacked into.  Credit cards and debit cards can be stolen.  Identity theft all over the world is absolutely soaring.

So companies all over the planet are working feverishly to make all of these cashless systems much more secure.

In the future, it is inevitable that national governments and big financial institutions will want to have all of us transition over to using biometric identity systems in order to combat crime in the financial system.

Many of these biometric identity systems are becoming quite advanced.

For example, just check out what IBM has been developing.  The following is from a recent IBM press release….

You will no longer need to create, track or remember multiple passwords for various log-ins. Imagine you will be able to walk up to an ATM machine to securely withdraw money by simply speaking your name or looking into a tiny sensor that can recognize the unique patterns in the retina of your eye. Or by doing the same, you can check your account balance on your mobile phone or tablet.

Each person has a unique biological identity and behind all that is data. Biometric data – facial definitions, retinal scans and voice files – will be composited through software to build your DNA unique online password.

Referred to as multi-factor biometrics, smarter systems will be able to use this information in real-time to make sure whenever someone is attempting to access your information, it matches your unique biometric profile and the attempt is authorized.

Are you ready for that?

It is coming.

In the future, if you do not surrender your biometric identity information, you may be locked out of the entire financial system.

Another method that can be used to make financial identification more secure is to use implantable RFID microchips.

Yes, there is a lot of resistance to this idea, but the fact is that the use of RFID chips in animals and in humans is rapidly spreading.

Some U.S. cities have already made it mandatory to implant microchips into all cats and all dogs so that they can be tracked.

All over the United States, employees are being required to carry badges that contain RFID chips, and in some instances employers are actually requiring employees to have RFID chips injected into their bodies.

Increasingly, RFID chips are being implanted in the upper arm of patients that have Alzheimer’s disease.  The idea is that this helps health care providers track Alzheimer’s patients that get lost.

In some countries, microchips are now actually being embedded into school uniforms to make sure that students don’t skip school.

Can you see where all of this is headed?

Some companies are even developing RFID technologies that do not require an injection.

One company called Somark has developed chipless RFID ink that is applied directly to the skin of an animal or a human.  These “RFID tattoos” are applied in about 10 seconds using micro-needles and a reusable applicator, and they can be read by an RFID reader from up to four feet away.

Would you get an “RFID tattoo” if the government or your bank asked you to?

Some people out there are actually quite excited about these new technologies.

For example, a columnist named Don Tennant wrote an article entitled “Chip Me – Please!” in which he expressed his unbridled enthusiasm for an implantable microchip which would contain all of his medical information….

“All I can say is I’d be the first person in line for an implant.”

But are there real dangers to going to a system that is entirely digital?

For example, what if a devastating EMP attack wiped out our electrical grid and most of our computers from coast to coast?

How would we continue to function?

Sadly, most people don’t think about things like that.

Our world is changing more rapidly than ever before, and we should be mindful of where these changes are taking us.

Just because our technology is advancing does not mean that our world is becoming a better place.

There are millions of Americans that want absolutely nothing to do with biometric identity systems or RFID implants.

But the mainstream media continues to declare that nothing can stop the changes that are coming.  A recent CBS News article made the following statement….

“Most agree a cashless society is not only inevitable, for most of us, it’s already here.”

Yes, a cashless society is coming.

Are you ready for it?

 

Article Source Link: http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/a-cashless-society-may-be-closer-than-most-people-would-ever-dare-to-imagine

JP